We are videos for our students

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In this digital world of STEM, 1:1, coding, SAMAR, Interactive Whiteboards, and 300 new apps being created daily (US News), as educators we have an abundance of resources to choose from and from which to engage our students in learning. Never before have we had such a supply of teaching resources and devices from which our students can use to learn. We are even moving one whole integral part of education to the web as we prepare for Smarter Balance or PARCC assessments next year. As educators try their best to keep up with ‘what’s new’, it is important that we become educated consumers of all this new technology and learn best how to integrate it into our classrooms or staff meetings. We know that without proper professional development to support educators around how to use technology to impact student learning, none of it will stay much less be used for what it’s intended…facilitating student learning and providing them exposure to the world they will work in. How much money has been spent on Interactive Whiteboards and how many are still used as big screen projectors for PowerPoint presentations?

This months #blogamonth is sharing favorite videos and how we use videos in education. I immediately thought of my favorite one to share and the message that it sends to all of us. My next thought was the realization that each and every day we are a video clip for our students, colleagues, and parents! When we stop to think why videos are a powerful learning tool in classrooms or staff meetings, I’d venture to say that it provides us with the realization that something we never did is possible, just by watching others do it first. We internalize the ‘yes we can’ mantra that got President Obama elected. All people love and need inspiration and to see the possibilities open to them, so what better way to demonstrate that then in videos of others performing the new task. As an instructional leader (which we all need to realize we are no matter your title), I am my colleagues and students video each time I model a lesson, share a thoughts and insights in a lit circle with students,  present at district institutes, meetings, teacher classes, lead a close reading of a difficult text, co-plan lessons with teachers, design PD. Why is coaching the most effective job imbedded professional develop there is…because its live and in action…because it demonstrates and inspires others so they can say “yes I can”.

What I’d like you to notice from the video clip I’m choosing to share and that I’ve used with staff is what is being modeled…how to facilitate learning so we can all say “yes we can”.

Until just recently Maurice (Mo) Cheeks was the head coach for the Detroit Pistons and previously a retired professional basketball player himself. The video is with a girl, Natalie Gilbert, who won the opportunity to sing the national anthem at one of the Pistons games and the even that followed. Please watch and then we can reflect. Video

This clip demonstrates perfectly what facilitating learning looks like and how a learning community works. Here is what I’m sure you noticed:

  • Coach stepped up to her gently from behind, placing a gentle hand on her shoulder and raised the microphone back up to HER, indicating it’s ok, I’m here but you can do this.
  • He never took the mic away for him to finish the song but raised it back to her twice showing her positive reinforcement and the confidence he had in her that she can and will finish the task successfully.
  • He never stepped out in front of her taking away her moment to shine.
  • He spoke the words into her ear from where she left off, not making her start over.
  • The crowd cheered her mistake and urged her on to finish, showing they understood the pressure and possibility of failure.
  • Everyone in the stadium shared the responsibility for her ultimate success by joining in and singing with her.
  • He never left her side showing unwavering support for her until she didn’t need it any longer.
  • He encouraged everyone to share in her success and strength by motioning his hands for them to join in and help. Knowing when to call in back ups is important, resourceful.
  • Everyone accepted the moment of failure as an opportunity for support her success and ultimately theirs.
  • The event didn’t stop but continued on through the mistake modeling that its normal to make mistakes and that we all should share the responsibility for each others success.

After it was all over, they exchanged hugs of support and thanks and Mo Cheeks walked away happy to have facilitated her success but never taking her dignity away. The truth is she was very prepared for her task as evidenced by her beautiful voice and the practice of high notes and long breaths. She was prepared, she came ready to give it her all, she put in her time of practice, and then nerves probably got the best of her. That happens everyday with our students, teachers, and parents and instead of presuming the negative…we MUST presume the positive and join in and facilitate them to success. What Coach Cheeks did in this video and that we play out everyday in our own live performances in the world of education is how through our learning communities we need to facilitate learning and model each day what the possibilities are and that ‘yes we can” do it…together.

 I hope you use the video and I would love to hear your experience.

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