Habits That LEAD to Change

tlim

“Words cannot express how grateful I am to be at a school filled with educators who believe in the power of their work and its ability to help reach the potential of each and every student.”

~ Excerpt email from a Kipling Elementary School parent

A Message of Gratitude to our Teachers

The sincere words of gratitude of a parent validate the passion and commitment educators at Kipling Elementary School bring to work every day. The email excerpt is evidence that our teachers change students’ lives by inspiring, empowering and engaging them in the classroom, on the playground, and beyond. Teacher leaders, administrators — educators everywhere — save and re-read precious letters like these as a reminder of why our work is important, and the impact we have on families and children every day.

Kipling Elementary School, in Deerfield Public Schools District 109, is honored to have won the IL ASCD Whole Child Award this year in the category of student engagement. In an effort to pay that honor forward, I am sharing the habits we live by in hopes that it might inspire you to continue to be change agents for your students and families. This article also is a tribute to the amazing teachers and staff at Kipling.

Habits that Lead to Change

Kipling Elementary School is a Leader in Me school; in our transformation, we have thoroughly adopted and built into our culture “The Seven Habits.” We are proud of the environment we have created and the impact and change we are leading in educating and engaging our students.

Our teachers are proactive and take initiative with the way they positively communicate with students, parents, and colleagues.

Our teachers begin with the end in mind and lead with inquiry and seek out to understand their students learning styles and social emotional readiness and availability in order to personalize learning.

Our teachers put first things first and establish caring relationships with their students and families and how they convey empathy and understanding.

Our teachers think win-win by embracing change and respond flexibly with confidence to new ideas that bring our students stimulating learning experiences and environments.

Our teachers seek first to understand and then to be understood when engaged in their own professional learning with coaches, colleagues and administrators. Their ability and willingness to listen and consider others viewpoints gives them the courage to challenge the status quo and change teaching and learning.

Our teachers synergize and interact with the whole school community. They value and seek out input from all adults that interact with students during the school day. They embody the mindset that diverse perspectives lead to richer stronger solutions.

Our teachers sharpen the saw outside of school that makes them stronger and more prepared to face each school day and each student with a bright smile and contagious energy.

At Kipling, those seven habits are the pieces that, every day, in every classroom, combine to build the whole child in every child.

Advertisements

Testing Time vs LEARNING Time

imgres

As if the frenzy of the beginning of the year isn’t enough, we add in student assessments for the fall to get benchmarks of where our students are and how much learning was lost over the summer. I’m in full support of testing and benchmarking! It is a very integral part of teaching and learning. What I am in more support of is every day learning between testing.  

Here are a few things we are busy doing and focus on prior to and during testing:

  • refresh/reboot student devices and test for tech capacity,
  • open optimal assessment windows,
  • communicate to parents that testing is coming up and kids need good night sleep and breakfast, and perfect attendance is encouraged
  • set testing schedule for classes,
  • identify alternate locations in the school to best assess certain groups,
  • pull all available hands on deck to support students with accommodations and modifications,
  • rework precious learning time around testing block,
  • remind/review with teachers how best to use the data we will receive,
  • deal with technical hiccups that disturb the testing process,
  • practice the use of mice and drag & drop strategies with our youngest learners,
  • field phone calls from parents eager to find out scores and enter their students into any gifted opportunities
  • communicate with parents again and remind/review how to interpret data and that this is only a small snapshot of their child’s ability used to gather benchmarks and set growth objectives
  • complete testing, reward students with recess, sigh of relief, and return to teaching as usual

Immediately after students take the test we rush to see how they did in this one moment in time.

This rush of urgency, pressure to perform, extreme collaboration with colleagues to help and cover each other and students, urgency to motivate and pump kids assurance that they will do and can do a great job, constant maintenance of technology to perform, transparent communication with parents about expectations, should be the norm every day IN-BETWEEN testing days. I contend that if we approached everyday LEARNING with this same intensity and send the same message of its importance; the day of testing would look and feel very different for our students.

Can we imagine, that one day students would walk into their classroom, look at the day’s schedule, see the words “Formative Assessment’ (nationally normed or good old fashion check for understanding), grab their device, sit down anywhere of comfort in the room, put their headphones on whether to listen to music or just create more quiet, and start the test. No fuss, no stress, fully confident, and excited for the challenge to beat their previous score knowing that they are active engaged learners everyday! What if we could get kids to approach a test like they approach playing video games against each other and encourage each other?

It’s time to shift the focus. Off of testing day, to ALL the other days of learning. What needs to change in our teaching, classroom culture, evaluations to make this happen for our kids so we can finally get the REAL information we need to change instruction? I’d love to hear your ideas! I have a few of my own.

The average # of school days in Illinois is 176 X 5 hrs a day = 880 hours of learning.

Let’s just say (I’m inflating) that PARCC (ELA & Math) will take the average student 12 hours and NWEA (ELA & Math)  3 X a year will take another 18hrs total = 850 precious engaging LEARNING hours in a school year are left to US! How will we use them?

(Even if my math is totally off, I hope you get my point)

This is what we should be focusing on and having an urgency to utilize to the best of our ability to ensure our students DO learn and grow.