Habits That LEAD to Change

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“Words cannot express how grateful I am to be at a school filled with educators who believe in the power of their work and its ability to help reach the potential of each and every student.”

~ Excerpt email from a Kipling Elementary School parent

A Message of Gratitude to our Teachers

The sincere words of gratitude of a parent validate the passion and commitment educators at Kipling Elementary School bring to work every day. The email excerpt is evidence that our teachers change students’ lives by inspiring, empowering and engaging them in the classroom, on the playground, and beyond. Teacher leaders, administrators — educators everywhere — save and re-read precious letters like these as a reminder of why our work is important, and the impact we have on families and children every day.

Kipling Elementary School, in Deerfield Public Schools District 109, is honored to have won the IL ASCD Whole Child Award this year in the category of student engagement. In an effort to pay that honor forward, I am sharing the habits we live by in hopes that it might inspire you to continue to be change agents for your students and families. This article also is a tribute to the amazing teachers and staff at Kipling.

Habits that Lead to Change

Kipling Elementary School is a Leader in Me school; in our transformation, we have thoroughly adopted and built into our culture “The Seven Habits.” We are proud of the environment we have created and the impact and change we are leading in educating and engaging our students.

Our teachers are proactive and take initiative with the way they positively communicate with students, parents, and colleagues.

Our teachers begin with the end in mind and lead with inquiry and seek out to understand their students learning styles and social emotional readiness and availability in order to personalize learning.

Our teachers put first things first and establish caring relationships with their students and families and how they convey empathy and understanding.

Our teachers think win-win by embracing change and respond flexibly with confidence to new ideas that bring our students stimulating learning experiences and environments.

Our teachers seek first to understand and then to be understood when engaged in their own professional learning with coaches, colleagues and administrators. Their ability and willingness to listen and consider others viewpoints gives them the courage to challenge the status quo and change teaching and learning.

Our teachers synergize and interact with the whole school community. They value and seek out input from all adults that interact with students during the school day. They embody the mindset that diverse perspectives lead to richer stronger solutions.

Our teachers sharpen the saw outside of school that makes them stronger and more prepared to face each school day and each student with a bright smile and contagious energy.

At Kipling, those seven habits are the pieces that, every day, in every classroom, combine to build the whole child in every child.

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‘AUTHENTIC Learning’ Mindset

 

 

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A week vacation skiing in Whistler with the family, suitcases full of clothes for 5, including bulky ski gear and a return home only to find that when I went downstairs to put the first load into the dryer…it breaks! F01 error code I learned, means panel control malfunction. So needless to say, I marched upstairs to my computer and what did I do? Yup, I Googled it!! I found a YouTube video of a 20 minute repair with a link to AppliancePartsPros.com and ordered the part. Two hundred and seventy dollars later, I  waited a week for the part to come in and then took my tools and went to work. I didn’t lose any parts or screws and the best part was when I plugged it back in and pressed that sweet button, sending the dryer drum rolling again! SUCCESS is a sweet reward!

This exact situation demonstrates all the components necessary in what is called authentic learning. “Authentic learning is a relatively new term that describes learning through applying knowledge in real-life contexts and situations.” as defined by Audrey Rule of the State University of New York (SUNY) at Oswego. There are four components to authentic learning and if we take a look at my experience we can identify each:

Real-world problemssmelly clothes, a family of 5 and no means to wash them. I was naturally incentivized to save some money by not paying for a plumber and do it myself. The satisfaction came when I accomplished what I intended and it worked. Even if it didn’t work, I would still have had the sense of satisfaction.  

Inquiry and thinking skills…Research! This was not my first home project so I had some background on where to start my research for an answer and how to go about solving my problem. I was also confident in my skills and abilities based on my previous successes. I have to say that it is getting easier and more convenient for do-it-yourself projects because of the internet and access to information both textual and visual. I had some initial trials and errors when trying to find the right ratchet wrench size I needed for the bolt screws, analyzing how best to pull the dryer away from the wall without detaching the exhaust vent hose (didn’t want to attach that again) or the gas line, not to mention once I removed the cover from the machine I needed to figure out how to unhook each wiring component and dismount the old control board.

Discourse in a community of learners…My earlier projects involved hanging out with my friends at Lowes or Home Depot asking for explanations of how-to-do this or that and then I’d go home to read the directions that came with the kit or ‘fix’ it project. I would not have been able to successfully fix the dryer if I went into it with my own thinking. Why do we always put kids into learning situations with their limited life experience bank thinking they will be able to figure anything out on their own without access to information, conversations and a community of other learners. That’s not the real world. We have to remember the needs of a learner in the moment of their learning…provide the opportunity for them to communicate, collaborate, question, grapple with their problem.

Student-directed learning…Open-ended and choice driven are the key to student learning. I may not have had the choice of my dryer breaking but I did have a choice in how I would solve my problem. The situation was open-ended in that it provided opportunities for… “divergent thinking, heuristics-based learning, and exploring fuzzy, ill-defined, and ill-structured problems”. I said earlier that I didn’t lose any screws…well I didn’t lose any but I did have an extra one left over. I had to think on my feet and make a judgment call when one of the screws needed for securing the control panel to the metal interior plate didn’t want to go back in its place. I determined that it was secure enough without it and didn’t want to risk forcing it in or having it fall down the side of the dryer as I struggled to ‘make’ it fit.

We must start providing students with opportunities to experience learning in this way. We must start to build their confidence, background and repertoire of learning.

We must start thinking of students as drivers of their learning. Learning is finding the best ways to access and internalize information in order to create/apply it to something new.

Let them do it! Get out of their way!

Because they CAN!

Please read this article for more information on authentic learning.

 

We are videos for our students

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In this digital world of STEM, 1:1, coding, SAMAR, Interactive Whiteboards, and 300 new apps being created daily (US News), as educators we have an abundance of resources to choose from and from which to engage our students in learning. Never before have we had such a supply of teaching resources and devices from which our students can use to learn. We are even moving one whole integral part of education to the web as we prepare for Smarter Balance or PARCC assessments next year. As educators try their best to keep up with ‘what’s new’, it is important that we become educated consumers of all this new technology and learn best how to integrate it into our classrooms or staff meetings. We know that without proper professional development to support educators around how to use technology to impact student learning, none of it will stay much less be used for what it’s intended…facilitating student learning and providing them exposure to the world they will work in. How much money has been spent on Interactive Whiteboards and how many are still used as big screen projectors for PowerPoint presentations?

This months #blogamonth is sharing favorite videos and how we use videos in education. I immediately thought of my favorite one to share and the message that it sends to all of us. My next thought was the realization that each and every day we are a video clip for our students, colleagues, and parents! When we stop to think why videos are a powerful learning tool in classrooms or staff meetings, I’d venture to say that it provides us with the realization that something we never did is possible, just by watching others do it first. We internalize the ‘yes we can’ mantra that got President Obama elected. All people love and need inspiration and to see the possibilities open to them, so what better way to demonstrate that then in videos of others performing the new task. As an instructional leader (which we all need to realize we are no matter your title), I am my colleagues and students video each time I model a lesson, share a thoughts and insights in a lit circle with students,  present at district institutes, meetings, teacher classes, lead a close reading of a difficult text, co-plan lessons with teachers, design PD. Why is coaching the most effective job imbedded professional develop there is…because its live and in action…because it demonstrates and inspires others so they can say “yes I can”.

What I’d like you to notice from the video clip I’m choosing to share and that I’ve used with staff is what is being modeled…how to facilitate learning so we can all say “yes we can”.

Until just recently Maurice (Mo) Cheeks was the head coach for the Detroit Pistons and previously a retired professional basketball player himself. The video is with a girl, Natalie Gilbert, who won the opportunity to sing the national anthem at one of the Pistons games and the even that followed. Please watch and then we can reflect. Video

This clip demonstrates perfectly what facilitating learning looks like and how a learning community works. Here is what I’m sure you noticed:

  • Coach stepped up to her gently from behind, placing a gentle hand on her shoulder and raised the microphone back up to HER, indicating it’s ok, I’m here but you can do this.
  • He never took the mic away for him to finish the song but raised it back to her twice showing her positive reinforcement and the confidence he had in her that she can and will finish the task successfully.
  • He never stepped out in front of her taking away her moment to shine.
  • He spoke the words into her ear from where she left off, not making her start over.
  • The crowd cheered her mistake and urged her on to finish, showing they understood the pressure and possibility of failure.
  • Everyone in the stadium shared the responsibility for her ultimate success by joining in and singing with her.
  • He never left her side showing unwavering support for her until she didn’t need it any longer.
  • He encouraged everyone to share in her success and strength by motioning his hands for them to join in and help. Knowing when to call in back ups is important, resourceful.
  • Everyone accepted the moment of failure as an opportunity for support her success and ultimately theirs.
  • The event didn’t stop but continued on through the mistake modeling that its normal to make mistakes and that we all should share the responsibility for each others success.

After it was all over, they exchanged hugs of support and thanks and Mo Cheeks walked away happy to have facilitated her success but never taking her dignity away. The truth is she was very prepared for her task as evidenced by her beautiful voice and the practice of high notes and long breaths. She was prepared, she came ready to give it her all, she put in her time of practice, and then nerves probably got the best of her. That happens everyday with our students, teachers, and parents and instead of presuming the negative…we MUST presume the positive and join in and facilitate them to success. What Coach Cheeks did in this video and that we play out everyday in our own live performances in the world of education is how through our learning communities we need to facilitate learning and model each day what the possibilities are and that ‘yes we can” do it…together.

 I hope you use the video and I would love to hear your experience.

Don’t just be on a PLC team…BE THE PLC TRIBE!

the element“Finding your tribe can have transformative effects on your sense of identity and purpose. This is because of three powerful tribal dynamics: validation, inspiration, and what we’ll call here the “alchemy of synergy.” Sir Ken Robinson, The Element

 I’m in the process of reading Sir Ken Robinson’s book, The Element, and find his common sense, straight forward, logical thinking a breath of fresh air. The book is primarily about how to find your “Element”, the place in which you are your best self and feel passion and purpose in what you are naturally meant to do. The book outlines several ways in which people have gone about fining their element. Of particular interest to me, was this notion Robinson calls ‘finding your tribe.’ I immediately started to think about the connection a ‘tribe’ has with a ‘PLC’. He says that a crucial component to finding your element, is finding your tribe. What I find so interesting is that he says that it’s not essential for members of a tribe to share the same vision and can either be collaborative or competitive. He explains that what connects a tribe is the ‘common commitment’ they have to doing what they feel they were born to do. Like in the quote above, what a tribe does is validates your belonging to that commitment, inspires you to “raise the bar” of that commitment, and synergy to elevate that commitment together as a tribe to attain what is not otherwise possible alone.

I would absolutely say that finding your PLC ‘tribe’ would have “transformative effects on your sense of identity and purpose” both as an individual and as an educational system, if that is what you come looking for. If you find this tribe, Robinson assures us we will also more likely find our “element” where we are creative, dynamic, passionate, and do our most brilliant work. We need to stop looking at a PLC as simply a team we belong to but rather a place we come to be in our “Element’; a tribe where we validate and inspire each other and bring our individual passions and abilities to create a collaborative synergy that elevates the whole tribes work, and each individuals passion, higher then could be achieved alone. This is the type of PLC tribe that impacts student achievement and promotes quality teachers who continually grow and learn out of a desire and drive they feel…because they have found their “Element”!

Observe a PLC team next time through the lens of whether they are a tribe or just a team? If your wondering what to look for, here’s a start…they drive their own agendas, push themselves, always question to learn, and put words and thoughts into action to see students growing and learning. They look like a beehive at the height of the honey season…all a buzz, each working seamlessly for the good of the hive and their future potential to be great!

If you are part of a PLC team, ask yourself why you are there? Like in the quote above, are you there to validate your belonging to your common commitment? Are you there to inspire each other to “raise the bar” of that commitment? Are you there to be part of the synergy to elevate that commitment together as a tribe to attain what is not otherwise possible alone?

My wish for all of you is to find your tribe, be a part of a tribe, and allow your identity and purpose to be transformed. Don’t just be on a PLC team…BE THE PLC TRIBE!